Robot-spirit.com Review Is Robot Spirit a Scam or Should I Invest

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Daxrobot.com Review – Is Daxrobot a scam?

Beware! Daxrobot is most probably a scam system! Your investment may be at risk.

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Open trading accounts with at least two brokers.

Crypto robots such as Daxrobot are splattered throughout the Forex trading world. Often made in the most absurd manner – their websites are quite self-serving and we will explain why. In most cases all they have to offer is a simple, narrated trailer-video which, ideally, should convince traders to invest with them. With Daxrobot we aren’t even presented with such a video. There is only a cut up image from a supposed “automated trading application”. In fact, we learn absolutely nothing about the product the crypto robot purports to provide, there are only small irrelevant pieces of information scattered through the website such as the mischievous statement that the “software goes to work automatically for you. Based on the pre-defined level of income you can double or even triple your result in one.”

From what we could gather – there appears to be some sort of autotrading application that needs only our initial deposit to begin filling our pockets with daily winnings. Attempting to register we ended up on the web page of an unregulated Forex brokerage Daxbase which is quite common with crypto robots.

No name, no address, no number

After doing our usual research we come across disturbing, but not unexpected, results. It turns out that Daxrobot is part of probably the most popular scam out there. Precisely through such websites, dressed up with farcical opportunities for winnings, traders are convinced to register and carelessly give away their address, phone number and email. Minutes later that same personal data is sent to brokers as “leads” and the registered traders begin getting phone calls from unregulated forex brokers like Capital4Bank or CCDFBank, urging them to invest. Cheap traffic is actually the product “Daxrobot” and their “team of talented brokers” are offering, not some trading application ahead of the market that may incur riches to any willing trader. And it would appear that Daxrobot is connected with the brokerage Daxbase which we have reviewed. More often than not, unregulated brokerages rely on such methods for attracting clients to their trading platforms.

No verified track record

Even if we choose to believe Daxrobot about it’s new product – which we certainly do not advise – there are still problems. To put it bluntly – we have no assurance for results. In trading there are social trading platforms such as the Zulutrade where you may search through the profiles of different traders and see how much they are winning or losing before investing funds with them. This is done through tracking every deal they have made and even seeing the results of all the rest of their followers. Such transparency adds significant assurance and partially, if not fully, removes risk. Where as with half-baked and senseless websites such as Daxrobot you are relying on blind faith.

No regulatory supervision

Furthermore, there is absolutely no regulatory guarantee about the whole product. The people behind the website do not fall under any regulatory oversight and their hands are untied to do pretty much as they wish. They also lack SSL encryption which compromises any information transferred through the website.

Last, but not least – the mere way in which such operations look for funds should raise major security concerns. If the crypto robot truly did offer an exciting and legitimate product, it would have found an alternative way of financing itself, instead of relying on cheap traffic through a cheesy bait-clicking commercial about itself. They could apply for a credit at the bank or raise money through crowd-funding. Although, in order to do that successfully, they have to be legitimate – which they most likely are not.

All in all, Daxrobot comes across as a standard scam operation – the likes of which we have seen a lot – and we advise those interested not to risk it.

User Reviews

When I was growing up, one of my favourite authors was Isaac Asimov. I loved his books and his ideas about robots. The man was a genius in the way he wrote, he invented the three laws of Robotics, as the very beginning of the movie tells us, they are: 1) A robot can never harm a human. 2) A robot must obey all human orders unless it conflicts with the first law. 3) A robot must protect itself unless it conflicts with the first two laws.

Because of this and because of the fact that I knew Will Smith was the leading actor in this movie I went into this movie with lowered expectations. I expected to see a corny movie full of explosions and killer robots.

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I did get that, or at least the explosions part, but imagine my surprise when the movie ended up exceeding my expectations and more. Even though during the ending credits it says that the movie was suggested by the books by Isaac Asimov most of the movie seemed to play quite well with Isaac Asimov’s ideas about robots. The movie played with concepts that Isaac Asimov played with, if the three laws can be made, they can be broken. And it was an Asimov-ish “whodunit” as well.

Will Smith managed to pull off a stunning performance as “Del Spooner”, a Chicago detective that is suspicious of robots and is against technology. His acting is much more like his acting in “Enemy of the State” than his performances in his other two Science Fiction flicks, “Independence Day” and “Men in Black”. He is a believable character, one that you end up sympathising with as you learn why, exactly, he hates robots so much.

A highly critiqued point usually comes from the fans of the book in that Bridget Moynahan plays Susan Calvin. It is true that Moynahan as Calvin is much younger than the Isaac Asimov version, but beyond that I found her to be a pleasant surprise as well. She plays her persona very well, delivering a wooden, robot-like performance. She is obvious in the fact that she likes robots much more than humans, and her dislike of Spooner is amusing. Over the course of the movie she thaws a little, but not an incredible lot. I find her to be a believable character.

The pure stroke of genius in this movie is the robot, Sonny, who at first reminds one of Data from Star Trek. His character evolves over the course of the story, and Alex Proyas does a good job at keeping us guessing at whether the emotional robot is a “good guy” or not.

This movie, which I’ve now seen twice, has been raked over the coals so to speak in the realm of artistic licence, but I felt that Isaac Asimov, if he were here, would have been rather pleased with this movie. The only two points of conflict, perhaps, would be the amount of violence against actual robots in the story (he was never that violent in his short stories/books) and the very typical Hollywood blow’emup climax, which, yes, smacked heavily of Terminator for a while there. The ending, I felt, repaired and wrapped up nicely, making up for whatever excessive action went on before it.

Two notes about the cinematography in this movie, first of all, the Matrix scene was not necessary. A character was being chased and did a Trinity pause in mid-air pose, which pulled me out of the movie for a couple seconds. Luckily it wasn’t too hard to get back into the movie. Second note was something that I felt was very innovative on the part of Alex Proyas, which was the “camera moving with moving object” shots. I noticed at least three of them in the movie. Very nice film work there. I’m sure it will get horribly overdone in the next few years, but for now it is nice. The CGI also gets honourable mention for making the robots meld so well with their surroundings. Finally CGI has reached a point where they don’t seem fake, even for a moment.

In regards to nudity in the movie. I’ve read a couple of reviews which notice the Moynahan nude in fogged up shower scene, and forget to notice the Will Smith completely nude with no fog shower scene. I must say, as a female viewer it is nice to get the generous end of the stick when it comes to seeing something as, dare I say appealing? as Will Smith’s very nicely developed body.

Lastly and in a point that has nothing to do with the movie and more to do with questions brought up by it– It took until a day later and thinking about the movie some more that I realized that “I, Robot” was also very socially different. As in two of the main characters, including the hero are black males, one woman, and one (male) robot. I didn’t find this odd at all in watching it, perhaps because Will Smith is such a recognisable character, but after thinking about it, I felt that this is a very positive sign. It shows, to me, that society is changing. I feel that I wouldn’t have been able to see that, even 10-15 years ago and thought nothing of it. I’ve noticed this before though. that the most gender/social equal views seem to come from science fiction in our media. it is interesting.

Now, of course the movie does bring up some ethical questions like if it’s all right to make a servant/slave class out of robots, etc., but all in all I really liked this movie. Any movie that makes you think is a good movie, any movie that gives you fun, drama, action, mystery, and makes you think is a great movie. Thank goodness I, Robot is all of the above.

From reading the comments posted by others I got the impression that people mainly rated it low because it did not follow the book. Just because a movie does not follow the original work like the Bible does not mean that the movie should not be given a chance. I read the Asimov book, and I went to the theater with my friend who has not. She enjoyed the movie just as much as I did, if not more. I was fascinated by the angle Proyas approached in the novel, and I did not mind one bit that the movie was completely different than the book.

Another element of the movie that receives an unfair “bad rap” is the acting. It’s no worse than the acting in the Spider-Man movies. I am by no means a fan of Will Smith, but I was a fan of Willem Dafoe, and that mirror scene in Spider-Man made me cringe. Might of worked on stage, Willem, but not on the big screen. I did not find myself cringing at any acting in I, Robot. In fact, the only thing over-the-top sometimes was the special effects. Other than that, nothing made me slink down in my seat and cover my face in shame.

One actor that deserves a shout out is Alan Tudyk. I read many comments where people think he just voiced the character of Sonny. Actually, Tudyk pulled a Gollum. This means he put on a weird looking body suit and actually acting out the scenes. Later, CGI used his performance to model the computer graphic robot. Except for a few obvious actions scenes, Tudyk *was* Sonny. My complements to his performance.

Hopefully, people will give this movie the chance it really deserves, and not base their decisions on how close it followed the book. I give I, Robot a 7.5/10

The maker of a film adaptation has three choices. First, he can try to translate the original medium as faithfully as possible, striving as much as possible to preserve the spirit and content of the original while re-imagining the story as a film. Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings films exemplify this approach. Second, he could instead try to capture the essence of the original, while largely abandoning the particulars of the original, as in the intelligently satirical but hard-hearted film version of Starship Troopers. Third, he can try to do something original with the material, drawing inspiration from the written story, but creating a unique film with a unique vision. I, Robot is more the the third than the first or second. While little remains of Asimov’s stories in this killer robot metropolitan fantasy, the film is informed by, and offers no disrespect, to the good Doctor’s creations.

Will Smith plays a Jack Slater-styled maverick cop. If it’s old, it’s good.

He wears vintage converse, listens to Stevie Wonder, and apparently regards sweet potato pie as a food group. Will Smith’s acting is a naturalistic shuffle, a Columbo-like pastiche of mumbling, sarcasm, and unexpected outbursts of charisma and off-balancing interrogation techniques. He delivers his one-liners with unnecessary seriousness. While in Men in Black, he aimed for the ballparks with his power-swinging action-comedy style, here his conscientious style gets in the way, suggesting a character who stands in front of the mirror practicing his zingers like a Tuesday night comic. It’s not entirely Smith’s fault, as the movie itself can’t seem to decide if he’s standing in for Bogart or Schwarzenegger, or if the character had a life of his own before the film starts rolling. His performance is intelligent, marred by occasional “Gotcha, suckaz!” moments that remind us that all films made in Hollywood are made in Hollywood.

His opposite, Bridget Moynahan, fits her role more surely. She’s an ice queen in the classic action movie tradition, a stiff-necked, self-important, lonely woman who has been absorbed by her work so completely she remains a teenager at heart, awkward, vulnerable, and searching for the approval of others. Moynahan’s bug-eyed discomfort and clipped, TV-sarcastic delivery are those of the quintessential comedy sidekick. Nonetheless, in rare moments, she invests the character’s personal revelations with warmth, doubt, and a glow of determination and moral purpose. While Smith vacillates between supercop and Bogie, Moynahan seems to have found a happy medium between the Saturday matinée and the midnight marathon, a mixture of fun and humanity with a carriage of seriousness appropriate to what is essentially a monster movie.

The robot, Sonny, is a character himself, a curious, frightened creature that seems capable of anything. Could Sonny be the murderer? We hope not, and yet, we see the grim possibility that a machine might consider itself more than a human being. We understand Sonny’s drive to live and grow. As human beings, we know what lengths we would go to to ensure our survival, whatever the moral charges facing us.

A top scientist has been murdered, and there are no human suspects, so the powerful US Robotics corporation (no relation to the modem manufacturers) convinces the powers-that-be to consider his unexpected death a suicide. Spooner (Will Smith) alone searches for the truth of the matter, fueled by hatred for robots and a personal debt to the dead scientist. Dr. Calvin (Moynahan) feels his intrusive investigation is unnecessary, although new pieces of evidence appear that gradually shake her confidence. Robots are programmed by the Three Laws to serve humanity, but Spooner is convinced one of the new NS-5 units, a unique prototype, is the murderer. As Spooner gets deeper to the heart of the mystery, the story explodes with robotic violence. Like all good mysteries, the real question is not “Whodunnit?” but “Why?” The heroes do some things for the wrong reasons, and the villains do some things for the right, rational reasons. Although I, Robot hardly pauses for introspection, it does asks us, “What makes a human being superior to a machine?” There are twists and surprises, although in the end, the movie plays out in the only way it can, a band of brave heroes trying to throw the ring into Mt. Doom while the armies of evil march. And yet, the movie leaves us wanting more. What is the future of humanity? How will we control our machines, and how will we prevent the machines from becoming our masters?

While not as ambitious as A.I., it is more successful, and while not as intelligent as Robocop, it is better played. While the movie does suffer from inconsistencies in mood and philosophy, such hiccups are secondary to the emotionality and drive of the film, its fury of thought as well as action. In moments, I, Robot is a terrifying vision of the future. Too few science-fiction movies manage to scare us with the power of technology, but future shock is vital to the science-fiction story. Modern science-fiction truly began with the detonation at White Sands. The Atomic Age has given way to the Digital Age, but we still have not solved the problem of how to wrest the power of technology from the creatures of the id.

Like the Matrix and many other major movies, I, Robot has its foundations in philosophy, in its case the question of epistemology(The study of knowledge itself and computers being self-aware).

Will Smith is Spooner, a cop with an apparent attitude problem. Set in the future, I Robot sees Spooner embarking on a puzzling case of suicide where he believes it was actually murder. By a robot.

In this future society (With more than a homage to Blade Runner) robots are used as slaves of humans in all facets of life. They have 3 rules of conduct hard coded into them which essentially state they cannot harm humans. So the postulation by Spooner that a robot killed a man after a history where no robot had ever committed so much as a mugging presents a big problem to both his peers and his boss.

Suffice to say the story’s plot thickens and a number of twists and turns emerge before the truth is revealed.

Will Smith is an absolute surprise here. Having previously been a light-hearted comedy actor he puts in a truly excellent and believable shift as a wise-cracking cop with a dark past.

However, the real star is the special effects and visual trickery. Impossible but ingenious camerawork and some jawdropping animation really make I, Robot feel truly alive and utterly believable, while never being dull for a second.

It arguably doesn’t delve too deep into its philosophical undertones, but it doesn’t really need to. It’s a traditional Hollywood blockbuster action flick but it unquestionably has a brain and is a clear cut above the likes of Armageddon et al.

It is the year 2035 and the world has forgotten the lessons we learnt in the 20th Century from films like Bladerunner and Terminator. Robots are the new must have accessory, carrying out menial tasks for households and boosting profits for businesses that have workforces not requiring payment. While this is now the norm, Officer Del Spooner refuses to move with the times and, due to an incident in his past refuses to accept the robots as anything approaching human. When an old friend, Dr Lanning – head of the robotics company, is found dead everyone suspects suicide but Spooner suspects a robot that flees the crime scene. Despite the robotics company lawyering up, Spooner continues his investigations and, several more malfunctions later, he begins to uncover a much bigger problem with the robots.

When the film opens with a flashback scene that cuts to a bitter, old-fashioned cop who dresses like Shaft and don’t take no rubbish from his weary captain I immediately started to worry that this would simply be a clichéd cop thriller in fancy clothes and, in some ways, that is what it was. But it is also good fun and, along with Spiderman 2, stands out as one of the best of this years generally disappointing crop of blockbusters. The plot is interesting enough to keep the film going and, although it goes just where you will expect it to if you’ve seen Terminator (or had any involvement in popular culture) it builds gradually with an intriguing investigation leading to a very impressive climax. The set pieces are well directed and are mixed well with the drama and the film delivers just what I had come expecting – fun, excitement, effects and an involving story.

Of course this is not to ignore the fact that the film has its weak points. The worn ‘tough cop’ clichés are heavy on the ground and show a script that hasn’t put as much effort into its characters as it really should have – this is also seen in Calvin, who’s background with Lanning is hinted at but never followed though. The film also hints at a very intelligent story around the robots but again it never totally follows through in as much detail as it could have done. The structure of the society is not clear – if robots have taken many jobs how can everyone afford a robot? Spooner lives in a poor, overcrowded area with graffiti on the walls but yet everyone owns a robot. While I accept that the film couldn’t go into the whole universe behind the scenario, it could have shown us an underclass just as easily as it showed us what I suspect were the middle classes. Likewise the final shot of the film implies that there is more to the robot-ethics of the story but mostly this is put to the side in favour of running and shooting. But these are minor complaints when you accept that this is not art – it is a blockbuster and, in this way, it succeeds and is an enjoyable film.

Matching the lazily written character that he is given, Smith plays it like Shaft. He eats pie and takes lots of sugar (but yet has a superb body – can’t wait for that part of the future!), makes wisecracks and sneers a lot.

He tries to bring something individual out in Spooner but mostly he settles for playing along with the clichés and delivers a familiar performance but one that fits well with the aims of the film. Moynnahan is a bit dry but actually works better than the usual screaming love interest that we get served with – thankfully the film resists the temptation to impose a romance on us. Tudyk looks the part and does a very good ‘HAL’ voice but he is constrained by his character and can only work within that – but he works it well enough. Greenwood is a good part, Cromwell’s familiarity helps us care for a character who has died before the film even starts, McBride is the gruff, weary captain but basically the film is Smith’s and his Shaft is quite fun. Outside of the real things, the effects are great – they look real and match the design of the future which is at the other end of the scale from the usual grim future that we all suspect will be nearer the truth! Alex Proyas may not be a great master of the narrative but he does OK here while also indulging his first love – the visual effects and style.

Overall this is an enjoyable summer blockbuster and stands out in the crowd of average sequels and trashy attempts at blockbusters that have crawled in and out of our cinemas this year. Yes, it’s full of the usual tough cop genre clichés and the sci-fi element doesn’t get as interesting or morally complex as it should have done but this is an action movie and I found it to do all the things I needed to do to entertain me – set pieces, interesting story, fun, effects that are actually special and a film that builds to a satisfying (if overblown) conclusion. In the cold light of day it is an imperfect film but it is easily one of the better blockbusters of 2004.

TBBOB

Fighting online scams since 2020

Alert – Option Robot is a scam – real review

One of our readers asked us to have a look at the “Option Robot” from OptionRobot.com and OptionRobot.co.uk. So here it is.

Option Robot is a robot that trades binary options. According to the web presentation it has an 83 % winning rate, which is pretty big for a free piece of software.

Table of Contents

Dangerous

The first thing that should serve as a warning with Option Robot is that it uses Martingale as one of the money management systems. We have warned against Martingale several times and we are going to do it again now.

Martingale basically means more than doubling your investment if you get a losing trade until you get a winner. This really can wipe out your account in a matter of minutes if you get a series of bad trades, which happens regularly in trading not only binary options, but in trading in general.

So any trading system that uses Martingale with binary options is extremely dangerous and you should stay away from it.

Although the presence of the Martingale system is enough for us not to recommend Option Robot, we decided to test it anyway. So we opened an account and started demo trading. And we immediately saw that there was something wrong.

In order to be able to concentrate on the trading, we let the robot trade only one pair, the EUR/USD, and only one trade at a time. We did not change anything else in the settings.

And look at the following video, on the left you can see Option Robot in action and on the right a real live EUR/USD price feed. We placed a yellow horizontal line at the price (+ – 1 pip) where the robot entered the trade.

As you can see, the Option Robot demo is faking trades, this trade should have been a loser. The price was going down, but the robot closed the Call option as a winner, although in reality it should have been a loser. You can see that the Option Robot demo price feed is not the same as the real price feed, after the trade is open it shows a price spike that never happened.

So trading on their demo can be very misleading. It is the same as with Ultimate4Trading, a fake demo will make you believe that the system is profitable, but if you open a real account through Option Robot and deposit money, it is very possible that you will lose it.

Conclusion

Option Robot is just another scam promising profits on binary options, but its real aim is to make you open an account and deposit money with one of their brokers, because they will get paid for it.

If you want to try binary options, do it on a free demo that is real with real results. Only then you will see what it takes to make money with binary options, no free robot can do this for you.

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